Building Brands: 21 Employer Brand Experts on LinkedIn

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If consumers don’t respect or identify with a brand, they don’t buy its products or services. The same is true for top candidates — if they don’t like what they see, hear or read, they won’t join a company. With unemployment in the US dropping and the global job market getting tougher each year, employer branding has become essential for any company looking to attract the best candidates.

Companies with positive brands get twice as many applications as organizations with negative brands, according to research from Betterteam. It also found:

  • Poor reputations force companies to pay higher salaries
  • 62 percent of candidates research companies on social media
  • 76 percent of candidates research companies on LinkedIn by looking at current employee profiles
  • 70 percent trust what employees say over official company branding.

With that in mind, we’ve source some of the best employer branding experts from around the world for you to follow on LinkedIn. Learning from these professionals can yield great insight into building a better brand for your organization.

Sarang Brahme

Sarang Brahme, global social recruiting and talent brand manager at Capgemini, defines himself as a “passionate recruiting professional who entered into industry by accident but became digital recruiting specialist by choice.” His guiding philosophy for recruitment is to “think like a marketer, act as a hunter but be human” and in doing so connect with candidates effectively and meaningfully.

Jaclyn Campbell

Canadian Jaclyn Campbell is plying her expertise as an employer brand consultant at Optus in Australia. Passionate about building employer brands in many ways, she argues that successful hires require that candidates experience the hiring company’s culture. When consumers are making a purchase, they try on the suit or test drive the car before laying out cash. Companies need to offer, as closely as possible, the ‘try before buy’ mentality.

So how do you do this? “The more you’re willing to share, the more you’ll attract talent that fit the puzzle,” Campbell writes. Brands need to be built on blogs and through videos, team photos and events on social media, killer career pages and employee ambassadors.

Lisa Guérin Cervenka

A self-proclaimed brand nerd, Lisa Guérin Cervenka co-founded Brand Amper, which was acquired by The Muse — she is the current employer brand evangelist. Guérin Cervenka’s 20-year career has focused on creating brand technology, creating customer engagement strategies and ideating new product features. During this time, she has learned that discipline, focus, and acute self-awareness are essential components for a successful employer brand. The best way she knows how to achieve this is through technology.

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Pramod Chaganti

Pramod Chaganti helps organizations build their employer brand. His specialties include GTM strategies, multi-channel management, pipeline forecasting, solution consulting, and team and relationship building. Active on Twitter, Chaganti discusses talent attraction, recruitment and advertising.

Carmen Collins

Social media and talent brand lead at Cisco, Carmen Collins is an authority on all things social, including how to use hashtags correctly. Her expertise extends to creating shareable social media posts and blogs, and building personal connections with future talent. In one year, her social tone and voice strategy increased Cisco’s Twitter followers from 2,000 to 20,000, Instagram followers from zero to 15,000 and in 2017 earned Cisco a place in the top 10 Fortune 500 talent brands.

Gareth Edwards

Executive vice president, Europe at AIA Worldwide, Gareth Edwards leads the AIA business in the UK, and TMP business in Europe. Edwards’s focus in on creativity in business, which is delivered by concentrating on technology and people. By doing this, Edwards is able to help clients define and articulate their talent story so they can engage the best candidates through effective internal and external marketing.

Hannah Fleishman

Hannah Fleishman, inbound recruiting manager at HubSpot, says she gets her motivation from New Yorker cartoon caption contests and Shadow, the golden retriever from Disney’s Homeward Bound. Fleishman is active on social media platforms such as Twitter and LinkedIn, as well as the blogging site Medium, where she crafts and shares positive experiences for candidates. She also aims to have compelling content reach candidates through the company’s jobs website, careers blog, emails, and personalized interactions.

Marie-Dominique Jacquet

Marie-Dominique Jacquet is executive coach at MDJ Conseil, a corporate training company in France. Before that, Jacquet (who is bilingual in French and English) was the employer branding director at L’Oréal. During this time, she distilled the company’s employer value proposition into three key pillars:

  • Create a thrilling experience for candidates by communicating the organization’s purpose and vision.
  • Create an inspiring environment through CSR and sustainability goals.
  • Develop a school of excellence so that brands and its products or services can attract the best candidates.

Jennifer Johnston Di Loreto

Senior director of global employer branding at Salesforce, Jennifer Johnston Di Loreto is an expert in her field. That expertised extends to audience/market research; messaging, brand and creative development; social and event marketing which includes both live and virtual event management; community management; and PR and media relations.

All her hard work has paid off with Salesforce ranking first on Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work list earlier this year. She and her team did this through its culture of Ohana — the Hawaiian word for family — which focuses on trust, growth, innovation and equality.

Jennifer Jones Newbill

As director of global employer brand at Dell, Jennifer Jones Newbill focuses on brand building and recruitment marketing through digital and social platforms. With more than two decades of experience in HR, Jones Newbill has shared her knowledge with businesses of all sizes, from startups to Fortune 50 companies.

She oversaw the talent acquisition team present its EVP document and social platforms, job boards, and event listings where they engage with candidates to Dell Blue, its internal agency, to develop the “Bring Everything” campaign. Jones Newbill also got Dell’s Social Media and Community University (SMaC) involved to train all relevant players on how to deliver the employer brand message.

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Kirstie Kelly

The founder of Kirstie Kelly Creative, which focuses on transforming businesses and people, Kirstie Kelly has a wealth of experience in brand building. She is also an expert in business mentoring, counselling and therapy, strategy development, team coaching and started an HR Tech SaaS business.

Kelly says that those employers who are effectively building their brand use expert marketers to make their advertising more relevant, thus engaging only the best candidates.

Audra Knight

Audra Knight is recruitment operations manager at Tenable, a global cybersecurity company. Through important brand messaging such as Tenable Stories, Knight and her team promote the  company’s defining attributes, such as its commitment to gender diversity. She achieves this on social media and in person by speaking at industry events.

Charu Malhotra

Charu Malhotra has been contracted by McKinsey & Company as its global recruitment communications lead to build the employer brand across its support centres. She recently left Ferrero, where she held the role of digital channels employer brand lead, and has more than 15 years of in-house experience within digital, employer brand and resourcing, working on accounts with BP, Unilever, Primark and Vodafone.

Malhotra believes in the power of social media in brand building and that positive employee experiences are key for successful employer brands. Another vital component of building a successful employer brand is a community of internal social advocates, Malhotra says.

Dani Novick

Dani Novick has been the director at Mercury Search and Selection for nearly two decades. Primarily focused on the UK market, Mercury is deeply embedded in the printing and packaging industries. Novick writes: “Employers…need to demonstrate some passion for their business and really believe in the opportunities it presents – if they can’t, why would anyone want to work there?”

Estela Vazquez Perez

A global employment brand director at Royal Bank of Canada, Estela Vazquez Perez works at increasing employer brand equity in targeted talent markets, and assists HR to design brand-building employee experiences. She is an active contributor to websites dealing with workplace and human capital.

Before RBC, Perez led global employer brand and recruitment marketing at Scotiabank and worked as a marketing and branding consultant around the world, including Canada, the US, Mexico, Chile, Peru, Colombia, Caribbean, the UK, Malaysia, Luxemburg.

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Ton Rodenburg

Based in the Netherlands, Ton Rodenburg is employer branding strategy director at ARA M/V Human Resource Communications, and has worked with Allen Overy, ATOS, the Dutch government, Microsoft, NIBC, and the Royal Dutch Air Force.

The important questions to ask when building employer brands, Rodenburg says, are: what makes people engage in their companies and how can we energize companies to create or enforce their uniqueness? These questions need to be answered with real experiences from genuine people.

Lars Schmidt

Lars Schmidt is the founder of AMPLIFY and co-founder of HR Open Source. Schmidt stumbled into his first HR role mainly so he could move to Los Angeles after college. Dividing his time between LA and NYC since then, Schmidt has spent most of his career in tech, capitalizing on the dot-com days of the late 90s. He ran global recruiting for Ticketmaster, Magento, and NPR before launching Amplify in 2013. His not-for-profit global initiative to accelerate learning and innovation in HR and recruiting, HR Open Source, started two years later.  

Leela Srinivasan

As chief marketing officer at recruitment software developer Lever, Leela Srinivasan leads employer branding strategy. The company needed to hire fast and skillfully in a time of rapid growth but had an introverted workforce reluctant to share their stories publicly. Srinivasan worked at developing a platform in which employees had the choice to engage and share their employment stories. These internal lessons have been effective with the company supporting hiring strategies at more than 1,500 companies, including Netflix, Eventbrite, VEON and Quora.

Jörgen Sundberg

As employer brand consultant and CEO at Link Humans and with more than 29,000 followers on LinkedIn, Jörgen Sundberg is a leading influencer based in London. Sundberg developed talent attraction tactics and strategies while managing recruitments campaigns for IBM, Accenture, SAP, and Deloitte.

He founded Link Humans in 2009 after assessing the power social media had at telling the stories of uncommon and non-traditional employer brands, and realizing that when the non-traditional aspects were emphasized, talent attraction improved. This knowledge gave him the confidence to encourage brands to take calculated risks by finding their true personality.

Cynthia Trivella

SmartSearch marketing manager Cynthia Trivella started in HR marketing communications and advertising on New York’s Madison Avenue two decades ago. She has experience in corporate HR, media planning, employment branding and human resource communications strategy experience. Trivella is on the list for Top 25 Online Influencers in Recruiting and the HR Marketer Top 25 Digital Media Influencers.

Shaunda Zilich

As global employment brand leader at GE, Shaunda Zilich develops strategies for recruitment marketing. An expert in branding, candidate experience, brand ambassador programs, EVP, and bolstering the digital presence of the GE employment brand, Zilich is also pragmatic and honest.

Case in point: When GE dropped from last year’s number one position for overall employer brand in WilsonHCG’s ‘Top 100 Fortune 500 Employment Brands’ to 11 this year, Zilich took to social media. She wrote about the experience and the company’s commitment to learn what had changed and how it could rise to the top once more.

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